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last 22 years to find out how we did it, what they can do. so here was the united nations who said okay, we'll come up with a convention, a treaty, all countries, put it out for them to sign up which encourages them to pale actually emulate what we did. this would have given us a seat at the table. we would be sitting at the table, helping other countries to bring their laws more up to what ours are in terms of the rights of people with disabilities. but we turned our backs on that. turned our backs on it. you know, mr. president, if -- there are a lot of things that make america a shining city on a hill but there's one thing that no one can dispute that does put america as a shining city on a hill, and that is the americans with disabilities act, and what it has done to our society. like our civil rights act. what it's done to break down the barriers and to show that people with disabilities can contribute to society, if only given the chance and the opportunity. i would think that we would want for them to then say yes, we'll be a part of a worldwide effort to break down those barrier
of a strong speech he gave at the united nations last month denouncing mass rape and impunity in congo. mr. president, the united nations has 20,000 member peacekeeping force in eastern congo to help the region's violence. the area is still very fragile. awash in weapons, warlords and competing regional interests but it's also rich in minerals that are found in our everyday electronics and cell phones. it's been said that congo war contains wars within wars and that's true, but fueling much of this violence is a bloody contest for control of these minerals. in the last congress i was proud to join in a bipartisan effort with senators brownback and others to protect the country's mineral wealth from fueling the region's horrific violence. the bill we passed asked for transparency from companies using these minerals and it has to be approved, i was happy to see in august that the securities and exchange commission approved the rule. it's a sound and fair rule. it was disappointed when the national association of manufacturers in the united states say they've already targeted this rule for a
this into an abortion debate is wrong on substance and bad politics. as to the united nations, i've heard people people say that ratifying the convention would take decisions out of parents' hands and let the u.n. or the federal government decide what's best for our children and that's just wrong. the treaty doesn't give the federal government or any state government new powers. with regard to children with disabilities and the treaty cannot be used as a basis for a lawsuit in state or federal court. former attorney general dick thornburgh made this crystal clear in his testimony before the senate foreign relations committee and in every conversation i've had with him. i would support the treaty if -- i wouldn't support the treaty if it were any other way. let's take a step back and look how this looks if america jeects this treaty. china has joined, russia has joined. we are the country that set the standards on rights for the -- of the disabled. we want everybody to play by international rules. we lose credibility if we turn around and refuse to participate in a treaty that merely asks other nations
was the in the united nations where i got educate. i look forward to hearing from you. >> thank you. >> can i say it's been an absolute pressure to hear you. it was worth traveling coach class. [laughter] [applause] >> the ultimate. >> to hear you spike. >> the first time i ever worried about you. >> us a tear i have -- [laughter] but you made the point that idea massive when you are changing things. they matter in national security. one of the reasons that america won the cold war, it recognized it was a moral conflict as much as nick else. an american realized they couldn't win the cold war and the -- [inaudible] in particular if it still had a scandal of segregation. so winning the civil rights a precondition of winning the liberty across the globe. no i think looking from the outside if you'll forgive me, the same danger now. go to china and i criticize them for the lack of democracy. but they say yes, they are educating all of their people. in the middle east and i talked to people there on the edge of radicalism. they say look at the -- [inaudible] justices in your british and european and ame
afghanistan under taliban control and is wanted by the united nations for possible war crimes. next we have mohammed nawi, another one of the individuals held at guantanamo bay. eats tied to a 2002 attack that killed two americans and he maintains loyalty to al qaeda. and let's be clear. many of the individuals who are being held at guantanamo bay right now, there is a 28% recidivism rate of those we have released back to foreign nationals who have gotten back into the battle against our country. these are individuals who have not renounced the war on terror. those that we are holding at guantanamo bay, those that we have released the recidivism record speaks for itself. they've gotten into the battle, they still want to be involved in terrorist activities, they still want to be a member of al qaeda or other terrorist groups and commit acts against our country and our allies. and, again, mohammed nabi is tied to a tack that killed two americans. he maintains loyalty to al qaeda and yet some of my colleagues, if you think about it, would insist other amendments we're dealing with today, that
lands. stand up for those who cannot stand up for themselves. this is not about the united nations. this is about common humanity. and this vote is to test whether the senate will stand up for those who cannot see or hear and whether senators can hear the truth and see the facts. please don't let captain brzynski down, please don't let senator bob dole down. most importantly, don't let the senate and the country down. approve this treaty. the presiding officer: the question occurs on the resolution of advice and consent to ratification of the convention on the rights of persons with disabilities. a senator: mr. president? i ask for the yeas and nays. the presiding officer: is there a sufficient second? there appears to be. the clerk will call the roll. quorum call: vote: vote: the presiding officer: on this vote the yeas are 61, the nays are 38, two-thirds of the senators present not having voted in the affirmative, the resolution of ratification is not agreed to. mr. reid: mr. president? the presiding officer: the majority leader. mr. reid: both senator mcconnell and i have approv
of the largest national organization of dreamers, united we dream. they will be planning their next effort, advocating for immigration reform legislation that will bring them and their families out of the shadows once and for all and give them a chance to earn their way to legal status and citizen thp in america. -- citizenship in america. one part of this immigration reform, the dream act is near and dear to me but i want to see comprehensive immigration reform before it is over. we know if we pass the dream act, it will help the economy, creating new jobs and economic growth when the talent of these young people, as they come out of high school and college is brought in our economy. in my home state of illinois, by 2030 the dream act will contribute $14 billion in economic activity, and dreamers would create up to 58,992 new jobs. i come to the floor to tell their stories. they used to hide in the shadows. they didn't want to talk about who they were because they were undocumented and afraid to be deported. many were deported. but i came to the floor to tell the stories of those who had
of these foreign national students trained in these stem fields to stay here in the united states and help create jobs here in the united states. this bill actually goes a step further, and what it does is it provides them a green card, a green card, which is the first step toward a path to citizenship. if you believe that this is a self-inflicted wound on our economy, you're exactly right, our current policy. we're educating brilliant students and then compelling them to go to work in shanghai or singapore rather than san antonio or the silicon valley. meanwhile, we're handing out tens of thousands of diversity visas to immigrants chosen by a random lottery, without regard to any qualifications they might when it comes to job creation and entrepreneurship. it makes absolutely no sense. i believe we need an immigration policy that serves our national interest. and if there's one thing that we need more than anything else now is we need job creators and entrepreneurs in the united states. and we know in the -- in the global economy, it's people with the special skills in science, technology, engin
but the united states of america is held together by a great national creed not by ethnicity or blood or religion, our national creed is an aspiration will narrative that it doesn't matter where you came from. it matters where you are going. you can come from homeless circumstances and do great things and the only way that is true is if you have access to a high-quality education and if it ever becomes the case as it is increasingly now, as i said many times i can look at your zip code and the social fabric of this country has no chance to hold together and we will be picked one against the other and those who are capable and those who are not. those who are employable and those who are not. i can assure you that you might not be able to control your circumstances but you can control your response to your circumstances. that will no longer be the way americans think about themselves or each other and that gives way to entitlements. at core, the real problem for us in national security is not just our competitiveness abroad, the great national narrative, this cohesion that has made us the country
/11, 2001, and talk to a nations, of very international crowd and ask what they thought of the united states, admired the united states and they resented the united states because it that time they didn't believe there were any boundaries to what could be done. that looks at the united states as the most innovative place in the world, constantly pull rabbits out of the hat and reinvent itself. go around world today facie a nation constrained, tied down, exhausted, limited, militarily overreaching, economically--even talking to tim geithner, can you go around and tell other economies what to do when you're in a glass house? it has been real limiting. when you look at barack obama's first meeting with angela merkel in london when the global economy was on fire is interesting. she laid down the gauntlet. we are not going to play by your rules. we are not going to spend like you are telling us to do. it has been interesting as a superpower to look at all limits we have even influencing a nation like germany. and yet brussels i asked to you think america has the same growth we once had that could
, it's worth that to families across the united states. for the good of this nation, for the good of the economy, for the good of these working families, for goodness sakes, pass this measure, this bipartisan measure that passed the senate last july. get this part done. we can debate the rest, but give peace of mind to meese working families and -- but give peace of mind to these working families and middle-income families that they're not going it see their income tax go up. madam president, i yield the floor. madam president, i ask unanimous consent to speak on a separate issue to be placed in a separate place in the record. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. durbin: madam president, it was a disappointing day yesterday when the united states senate failed by five votes to pass the convention on disabilities. it is a measure that i'd worked on with former california congressman tony coehlo, who has been an outstanding advocate for the disabled in america. throughout his career in congress and since. but it was also an effort toker one particular end -- for one particu
in some sort of depth the various national security challenges facing the united states, and in the case, not only the united states but also the african continent. when you look at the area of responsibility africom has, it's so-ing, in terms of complexity and geography. many of you are well aware, at least this informed audience, that counterterrorism is still an issue the united states needs to take seriously. i think for some, with respect to africa, came to light with the tragic events in ben georgia circumstance but as general ham well knows, this has been challenging the united states and others for quite some time. the terrorist threat has metastasized. ding-dong, the witch is not dead, referring to osama bin laden. you see threats move and gravitate to un and understood protected areas. obviously al qaeda some the islamic maghreb seems to be on the march. they're spread and the al qaeda arabian peninsula, operating out of yemen, and one of these more or less undergoverned spaces. lots of opportunity but lots of concern. whether it's narcostates in the south, to huge challenges w
a former chief justice of the connecticut supreme court, a former united states attorney, several partners at major connecticut and national law firms, an academic, business leaders and community leaders throughout the state. their insights and hard work throughout the process were really invaluable to my colleague from connecticut and i, and i express on this floor my gratitude to them for their service. based on the work of the advisory panel and our review of its recommendations, senator blumenthal and i recommended michael shea to the president for nomination. i will say that michael was ranked very high among the applicants, highly qualified applicants for this position by all members of the advisory panel, and i should say here right at the outset that we are grateful to president obama for nominating him for this place on our court. michael shea is a native of west hartford, connecticut, a graduate of amherst college and yale law school, served as a clerk to judge james buckley, though a resident of connecticut, sat on the u.s. court of appeals for the district of columbia. michael
are united as a united states of america, as senator menendez has said. hurricane sandy's scale and scope of destruction made it one of the largest national disasters to affect our nation leaving millions of people in the tristate region without homes or electricity and costing tens of billions of dollars in damages to governments, businesses and residents. the sweep and depth of destruction and human impact and financial effect was simply staggering, and our response now has to match its historic magnitude. we need to think big and act big with urgency and vision. right away, short term, we must redouble our efforts to reduce the personal costs and property damage of this storm and ore storms -- other storms, and longer view the path toward enlightened protection and preparation must include infrastructure improvements that may seem massive, but they are well needed and te -- deserved, such has been done with stanford, connecticut's floodgate repairs, steps to stop flooding on the river and electric security measures such as the establishment of microgrids and increased availability of g
or tornadoes or earthquakes around the country. we are united, as a united states of america as senator menendez has said. hurricane azande's scale and scope of destruction made it one of the largest national disasters to affect our nation leaving millions of people in the tristate region without homes or electricity and costing tens of billions of dollars in damages to governments, businesses, and residence. the sweat -- the suite of destruction and human impact and financial impact was simply staggering, and our response now has to match. we need to think big and act paid with urgency and division right away. short term. we must redouble our efforts to reduce the personal cost and property damage of the storm and other storms and long review the path toward enlightened protection and preparation must include infrastructure improvements. m.a.c. massive, but they are well needed and deserved such as has been done with stanford, connecticut floodgate repairs, steps to stop flooding on the plus atomic river and electricity security measures such as the establishment of micrograms and incr
and protecting our national security. the united states has and ought to have a zero tolerance policy against government employees and contractor personnel engaging in any form of human trafficking. these values are transcendent of party lines, of any other interests. i'm very proud to offer this amendment, in fact, with strong support across the aisle led by my colleague, senator portman, who has joined me in forming a human trafficking caucus to lead the way on these issues, and this amendment is a result of efforts that we have led and very simply represents the most comprehensive legislative effort ever undertaken in the united states congress to stamp out human trafficking in overseas contracting and i am happy to yield to my colleague from ohio, senator portman. mr. portman: thank you, mr. president. i'm pleased to join my colleague from connecticut in offering this amendment which is modeled on this legislation that he talked about. it is bipartisan that we introduced in march along with a number of senators on both sides of the aisle. we also recently joined together to form a senate
to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the presiding officer: the clerk will read a communication to the senate. the clerk: washington, d.c, november 30, 2012. to the senate: under the provisions of rule 1, paragraph 3, of the standing rules of the senate, i hereby appoint the honorable christopher a. coons, a senator from the state of delaware, to perform the duties of the chai. signed: daniel k. inouye, president pro tempore. mr. reid: mr. president? the presiding officer: the majority leader. mr. reid: following leader remarks, the senate will resume consideration of the defense authorization act. there will be four roll call votes at 9:30 a.m. i ask unanimous consent that all votes after the first vote be 10 minutes in duration. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. reid: mr. president, this week something rare occurred here in the senate. we debated a bill under regular order. no filibusters were mounted, no cloture motions were filed on the motion to proceed. th
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17